KS3 Humanities

A Key Stage 3 groups will be following an internal programme, which will link into other subject areas such as Citizenship, Geography, History and Religious Studies. Throughout the academic year pupils will work towards the following topics:

1. Animal Rights:
Within this topic pupils will become familiar with the key teachings from the religion(s) studied and develop an awareness of how religious leaders and other faith members have interpreted these teachings and applied them to life in society today.

  • religious beliefs about the status of animals;
  • the extent to which animals are different from humans and their relative value;
  • religious views on animal rights and the means of protecting those rights;
  • religious responses to the preservation of species from extinction;
  • the contemporary use and abuse of animals including:
    • companionship, e.g. pets, guide dogs,
    • animals in sport, transport and work,
    • animal experiments,
    • farming of animals (including free range and factory farming),
    • zoos,
    • hunting,
    • bull fighting,
    • the fur and ivory trades,
    • genetic modification and cloning of animals
    • treatment of wildlife;
      • issues concerning the slaughter of animals, meat, vegetarian and vegan diets.

2. Planet Earth:
Within this topic pupils will become familiar with the key teachings from the religion(s) studied and develop an awareness of how religious leaders and other faith members have interpreted these teachings and applied them to life in society today.

  • religious beliefs about the origins of life;
  • religious views about the nature of Planet Earth, e.g. awe and wonder;
  • religious beliefs about care and responsibility for the planet – stewardship;
  • the work being done to look after the world – conservation, earth summits, international action, targets to reduce carbon emissions/greenhouse gases, sustainable development;
  • problems caused by pollution, such as acid rain, oil spills, toxic chemicals and pesticides;
  • effects of modern lifestyles – through emissions from cars, factories and waste, recycling;
  • the debate about and the effects of climate change (global warming) – severe weather, droughts, floods, famine, destruction of crops, effect on plants and animals;
  • the use and abuse of natural resources, e.g. oil;
  • destruction of natural habitat, including deforestation.

3. Prejudice:
Within this topic pupils will become familiar with the key teachings from the religion(s) studied and develop an awareness of how religious leaders and other faith members have interpreted these teachings and applied them to life in society today.

  • types of prejudice, including religion, race, colour, gender, age, disability, class, lifestyle, looks;
  • the causes and origins of prejudice, including ignorance, stereotyping, scapegoating, influence of parents or media, victims of prejudice, experience;
  • concepts of tolerance, justice, harmony and the value of the individual;
  • religious attitudes to prejudice and discrimination;
  • effects of prejudice and discrimination (including the idea of positive discrimination);
  • religious responses to prejudice and discrimination by individuals, groups, society and the law;
  • religious believers who have fought against prejudice, e.g. Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Desmond Tutu.

4. War and Peace:
Within this topic pupil will become familiar with the key teachings from the religion(s) studied and develop an awareness of how religious leaders and other faith members have interpreted these teachings and applied them to life in society today.

  • the concepts of peace and justice and the sanctity of life in relation to war and peace;
  • the causes of war;
  • conflict, including examples of recent wars;
  • the reasons why religious believers might go to war, including the criteria for ‘Just War’ and ‘Holy War’;
  • religious believers and pacifism;
  • victims of war, including refugees, those maimed;
  • organisations which help victims of war, e.g. The Red Cross, The Red Crescent;
  • the work of a religious believer who has worked for peace;
  • peacekeeping forces, e.g. United Nations, NATO;
  • issues such as terrorism, weapons of mass destruction and nuclear proliferation;
  • arguments for and against nuclear weapons, including proliferation;
  • religious beliefs and teachings and modern statements about war and peace.